Tag Archives: comic book pitch

Spotlight on Dkaotic!

Honestly, I don’t really feel like blogging today.

Yes, it is Sunday and Sunday is blogging day but I would rather be immersed in the world of the stories I am currently working on. What happened is that earlier this week (or was it last week?), I contacted DKaotic, the artist with whom I worked on Arthur King, to let him know I really wanted to work with him again.

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Who doesn’t want to see more of that gorgeous Art?

And he  responded with an enthusiastic YES which really made my day. And no, it’s not just because DKaotic and I are both French, though we all know that French people are awesome.

My goal for this year is to develop a new pitch, taking into account everything I learned from putting the Arthur King pitch and short story together. I aim to develop pitches for 4 issues mini-series since, from what I have heard from professionals (especially on the excellent Word Balloon Podcast), it is much easier (if easy at all) to get picked up by a publisher if you pitch a shorter 4 issues story. You know, because I am still very new to this and no one knows me, except you.

I had such a great time working with DKaotic and I enjoy his Art and work ethic so much that I am currently developing projects for him.

You should really check out what he’s been up to on his website and on his portfolio.

Below is a video of one of my favorite thing of his, truly inspiring stuff:

Now you can see why blogging today is not my favorite thing to do. I would rather be spending time in DKaotic world.

-N

 

Iron Circus Submission

Alright folks,

My Arthur King submission to Image is in the mail and, earlier this week, I also turned in my submission to the Millarworld Annual Hunt. I am also still working on my 22 pages script for the Top Cow Talent Hunt. Who said there were no opportunities for aspiring professional Comic Book writers out there? Not me. I did not say that.

As if this wasn’t enough, a new opportunity arises:

The Iron Circus Submission.

The publisher of the infamous Smut Peddler just opened its doors to comic book creators. Iron Circus is accepting proposals for 150 to 500 pages graphic novels and Erotic Graphic novels. Just no Zombies, no superheroes, and nothing for kids unless it’s a GN for 12 years old and older.  But not Erotica. To be clear, they DO NOT accept Erotic GN for kids, you perv.

So, let’s see, what are they asking for?

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1. A complete creative team.

Oops. Did I say opportunities for Comic Book Writers earlier? Don’t let it discourage you. Come up with a story and then find an artist. I found the fantastic DKaotic on Elance.com (now Upwork.com) and so can you. Just remember, Artists don’t work for free. At least, buy them a beer or a sandwich.

2. Short Creators Bios.

Uh duh.

3. A one page outline or summary of the entire story.

Just like the Image outline. Only ONE PAGE. Raaagh… tough stuff. To be clear though, I am not going to pitch Arthur King to Iron Circus. It’s just not their thing. Just like always, you wanna make sure you’re pitching a story that fits the publisher’s publishing history. Arthur King just ain’t their jam but I’ve got a story up my sleeves that I always thought would be the perfect fit for their Art style and story content.

4. A production timeline.

Wow, I simply have no clue how long it would take me to actually write a 150 pages GN. And how long would it take the artist? That is something to definitely figure out. You know, because I also have a day job. Great, challenging question.

5. Five Complete Comic Book pages.

As of now, I am thinking of actually making an eight pages story so that I can use it for other submission and as part of my portfolio.

So yeah, that’s my plan.

I want a solid outline, an exciting 8 pages script, hire an artist, and make the damn Comic. Pretty much like I did with Arthur King and The Activist shorts so that, regardless of the outcome, I will have a pitch-ready story with Artwork that I can show to potential publishers.

I would just add one more thing. Make sure this is a story you want to tell. It just so happens that the story I have in mind is a good fit for the Iron Circus submission but I would have written it anyway, submission or not, because it’s a story I want to tell that I think also happens to be awesome.

-N

Comic Book Pitch

I am currently working on a Comic Book Pitch for Arthur King.

Writing a comic book pitch is a lot harder than I thought it would be. I actually believed that I already got it since I had a logline, a synopsis, and an outline ready to go. But a pitch is so much more than just a run down of your plot and, simultaneously, so much less. It is like squeezing concentrated story juice.

So I did some research and found a couple resources that have proven deadly helpful.

Comic Book writer Jim Zub (Skullkickers, Wayward) posted a four part blog post on how to write a comic book pitch. If you intend on ever pitching your book to and editor or a publisher, don’t waste your time and go read it now.

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Jim Zub has got quite the temper.

 

I spend all day yesterday trying to distill my story to its core essence and asking myself questions such as “Why should we care?” “What it is about?”

Though I have answers to those questions, the real challenge is to present your story in a concise and entertaining fashion. People are not interested in a simple run down of your plot scene by scene. Instead, you should spark their interest with a snappy logline. Show them your characters’ arc(s) and tell them the entire story in one paragraph or so. No more. You should also follow their guidelines, if any. For example, the editor I am sending my comic book pitch to wants no more than 3 pages.

I worked hard to cut the fat off of my pitch. Then, it downed on me. I already had successfully pitched a story. Loony the Moonian makes Friends to 8th Wonder Press.

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8thwondersubmissionNicolasIzambard_Page_4What that pitch does right is that it has ART.  Lots of it. You must include some kind of artwork; so yes, you must find an artist and work with them. It’s even better if you have sequential artwork, not just sketches.

What is wrong about this pitch is that I run through the entire story, basically providing a moment to moment outline. Loony is a 12 pages story and I ramble on for over a page and a half! Not good. Can you imagine if I did that for a 6 issue story arc? Yuk.

One more thing. Writer Brandon Seifert (Witch Doctor) has been sharing some of his pitches on his Facebook page. They are prime examples of what a one page comic book pitch should look like. Intriguing and quite brilliant. They make you want to read his stuff! And that’s exactly what your comic book pitch should do.

-N