Bag and Board.

Though I have been reading Comicbooks from a young age, I am still very, very new to Comicbooks in their original format. When I was a kid in France, American Comicbooks were published in magazine format containing up to 4 stories.

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I also read french Comic Books such as Asterix and, my very fav,  Gaston Lagaffe.

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Even after living in the US for almost 10 years, I had never had the need for bag and boards, always perfectly happy with buying or checking out Trade Paper Backs from the library.

Until I realized I had to keep up with the Comic Book du jour as one might say. I figured, as a Comicbook writer, I should do my best to know what’s going on in the Comicbook world now and not 6 months or one year later (too late). So I started following Greg Rucka’s Lazarus. Awesome.

I also somehow had a pile of comic books that people gave me as presents (because they know I love Batman) and also some I found at garage sales or Goodwill and whatnot.

I then decided I should bag and board them and put them in nice boxes. I had no idea how involved that process was. Here is some help for you:

And voila. Hard to believe I already went through 200 bags and boards! What??? Yep, crazy. I love it. Not only does it look good, it ‘s also very neat and organised.

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That’s a short box by the way. There is also a long box. It’s acid free so it does not hurt your comics. The boards to put on the back of the comic should be acid free as well. See how complicated this is? Oh, and I still can’t really tell which side of the board is the “shiny one” that you put to the back of the comic. Who knew…

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